UNIT 33
Adverbs: frequency and degree
A
Frequency (how often)

regularly
seldom (formal)
always frequently fairly often sometimes occasionally hardly ever never
usually generally
rarely

Adverbs of frequency go before the main verb with the exception of the verb to be:
   
I rarely see them.
She is often late these days.
They hardly ever go to the movies.
I've never tried Korean food.

Sometimes
and occasionally can go at the beginning or end of a sentence:

My parents give me money sometimes.
Sometimes my parents give me money.
I play tennis occasionally.
Occasionally I work on weekends.
   
B
Degree (how much)

slightly kind of rather quite
extremely
a (little) bit somewhat fairly pretty very
terrily
incredibly

Kind of, pretty, and incredibly are mostly used in spoken English:

That car is incredibly expensive.
The food was pretty good, [almost "very" goodj
I'm kind of curious, [fairly; in some ways]

Rather is sometimes more formal than the other words. Quite often means "very," but not "extremely," e.g., "It's quite warm [very warm] outside." Some speakers use quite to mean "fairly" or "moderately," depending on the context.

C
Almost/nearly

It's almost/nearly five o'clock. [It is a minute or so before five.]
I almost/nearly lost the game. [I won, but only by a small amount.]

D
Hardly

Hardly
+ a positive often has the same meaning as almost + a negative:

I hardly had anything to eat for lunch. [I had almost nothing.]
She could hardly walk after her operation. [She almost couldn't walk.]
We hardly ever go to the beach. [We almost never go to the beach.]

Note: In the first two sentences above, you can also use barely with the same meaning.